Akron ABA therapists

How Our Akron ABA Therapists Work With Occupational Therapists to Provide Kids Optimal Care

When it comes to treating a child with developmental delays, disabilities, or injuries, it’s important to keep in mind that a child is a whole person. What we mean by that is that when we’re treating a child with complex needs or conditions, it would be easy for therapists in separate disciplines to focus only on the symptoms/skills they specifically are treating. But a “whole child” approach taken by our Akron ABA therapists, occupational therapists, and speech therapists considers that these systems are all interconnected – and we can make faster, more meaningful progress when we collaborate and work together.

ABA therapy (applied behavioral analysis) is an evidence-based therapy that is utilized to treat children with autism and certain other conditions with a focus on social communication, disruptive/harmful behaviors, motor skills, and more. The general thinking is that whenever a behavior is followed by something of value (in a sense, rewarded), it’s more likely to be repeated. That works both ways. Behavior that is unhelpful or dangerous can be unintentionally “rewarded” by certain outcomes (attention, avoidance, etc.). By the same token, ABA looks at the child’s motivation behind the targeted behavior and then seeks to alter the consequence, depriving them of the “reward” for unhelpful behaviors while rewarding those behaviors that are helpful/expected.

Occupational therapy, meanwhile, helps individuals achieve specific goals that involve engage in meaningful activities of daily living. That could mean anything from teeth brushing to handwriting to avoiding major meltdowns when moving from one activity to the next.

When ABA and OT professionals work together in a clinical setting, it improves the child’s overall success. therapists are able to be in constant communication with those in other disciplines about the child’s progress, methods that aren’t working, cross-promoting skills that are being targeted in both disciplines, and each providing useful strategies that the other finds most effective.

Every child’s treatment plan at Therapy & Wellness Connection is tailored to that individual, with a focus on how we can lay the foundation needed to help them build the skills necessary to succeed in everyday activities – from self-care to school to making new friends to learning how to regulate their own emotions. When both occupational therapists and ABA therapists work together (or at least, coordinate their strategies), they can each help reinforce the lessons the other is trying to teach. Both are most effective when provided in a way that is playful in an environment that is both safe and fun.

Both disciplines approach therapy with similar goals and methods. For example, occupational therapists will break down mechanical processes of certain tasks so that the child has an easier time correcting their current approach (or developing a new skill) so that they can ultimately achieve their goal. In behavior therapy, Akron ABA therapists break down each task into a smaller steps, one-at-a-time.

Both work to address sensory processing disorders in similar ways as well. A person with sensory processing issues may have extreme aversions (or penchants for) certain sensory stimuli – lights, sounds, tactile pressure, textures, tastes, crowds, etc. This can manifest itself in different ways.

For example, a child who has a major sensitivity to lights and sounds may have a really difficult time in a grocery store. Akron ABA therapists will look at the behavior (a meltdown) and try to determine, “What is the motivation?” In this case, perhaps it is avoidance. The meltdown gets them out of the bright, loud environment. They then look to see how they can alter the antecedent (what happens right before) and the consequence (what happens right after) to modify or extinct the behavior. In this situation, they may see whether a visual schedule (helping them know exactly what to expect and for how long) or possibly some sort of adaptation (headphones, sunglasses, etc.) may help avoid the meltdown. Alternatively, they may initiate a positive reinforcer for the child engaging in short periods of time in bright or louder environments, gradually building up their tolerance level – and empowering them to communicate when a situation is becoming too overwhelming and they need a break.

Similarly in occupational therapy, the therapist will use a sensory integration approach to help kids gradually desensitize (or learn to better “read” the sensory input they are receiving) to certain stimuli. It’s done of a period of weeks, months, or even years, little-by-little. OTs also work toward helping these kids be able to advocate for themselves and more effectively convey when something is uncomfortable, painful, or difficult. When OTs and ABA therapists collaborate, they can each reinforce the goals of the other with the same child.

Given that so many children with autism spectrum disorder have both behavioral and sensory issues, it makes a lot of sense for us to initiate a cross-disciplinary approach that will set the stage for our kids to be successful and have the highest quality of life possible.

Therapy & Wellness Connection – your connection to a life without limitations – provides ABA therapy to children in Akron, Cleveland, Brecksville-Broadview Heights and surrounding communities. We also offer summer camp, day programs, education services, vocational counseling and more. Call us at (330) 748-4807 or send us an email.

Additional Resources:

Applied Behavior Analysis, Psychology Today

More Blog Entries:

How Long Will My Child Need to Be in Cleveland ABA Therapy? Dec. 23, 2022, Akron ABA Therapists’ Blog

Akron occupational therapy

When Should Kids Learn to Button & Zip? Akron Occupational Therapy Insight

Learning to zip, button, and use “fasteners” for dressing is a key self-care skill. Multiple times every day, we’re zipping jeans, buttoning shirts, zipping coats, buttoning pajamas, etc. We don’t expect kids to learn all this overnight, but as our Akron occupational therapy team can explain, mastering these skills to the point of being able to handle them without the aid of a parent or teacher is key to a independence.

For kids with developmental delays and disabilities, acquiring these skills may take a bit longer. Our Akron occupational therapy team can help.

Although every kid develops at their own rate, the general consensus is that typically developing kids will:

By age 2:

  • Unzip zippers with large tabs.
  • Pull a zipper up if an adult holds the bottom tight.
  • Unbutton larger buttons of 1 inch or more.

By age 3:

  • Unbutton 3 large buttons, even if they don’t do so in the exact right order.

By age 4:

  • Unzip and unsnap clothing while wearing it.
  • Close the front snap on their clothes.
  • Button and unbutton while wearing a front-opening garment.

By age 5:

  • Open all fasteners on any piece of clothing.
  • Hook and zip up on their own.

By age 6:

  • Can hook and zip on their own while wearing clothes.

There will of course be some variations – even among typically-developing children – but it’s important to bear in mind that each set of skills requires children to master other prerequisites. For example, a child without a neat pincer grasp (where the thumb touches the index finger while picking up a small object) is necessary before you can have any expectation that a child can start to take on zipping and buttoning.

Why Our Akron Occupational Therapy Team Prioritizes Button and Zipper Mastery

What’s the big deal with buttons and zipper? Occupational therapy is an area of practice concerned with helping people of all ages and abilities gain and maintain independence and success in the tasks of daily life. The ability to dress your own self is a matter of independence, and part of the “occupation” of daily living.

When we see a child is struggling to button, zip, and fasten, we look to see where are the skill deficits. Often, it’s one of the following areas with which they’re having difficulty:

  • Hand-eye coordination.
  • Visual skills.
  • Pinching and grasping.
  • Motor planning.
  • Sequencing.
  • Bilateral coordination.
  • Trouble paying attention.
  • Low frustration tolerance.
  • Lack of exposure or practice.

Once we’ve identified where the trouble spots are, we can incorporate “play time” exercises that will help kids gain confidence and work up to these skills.

If your child has ongoing struggles with these or other skills necessary for independence, our Akron occupational therapy team at Therapy & Wellness Connection can help.

Therapy & Wellness Connection – your connection to a life without limitations – provides occupational therapy to children in Akron, Cleveland, Brecksville-Broadview Heights and surrounding communities. We also offer summer camp, day programs, education services, vocational counseling and more. Call us at (330) 748-4807 or send us an email.

Additional Resources:

Developmental Milestones: Dressing Skills, Children’s Hospital of Orange County

More Blog Entries:

5 Signs Your Child May Need Akron Occupational Therapy, Sept. 17, 2022, Akron Occupational Therapy Blog

Akron occupational therapists

7 Summer Activity Ideas From Our Akron Occupational Therapists

As Akron occupational therapists, we’re frequently working on things like handwriting, self-regulation, and executive functioning. But summertime play is a veritable goldmine of sensory activities that can help boost a child’s development.

We’ve put together a list of summer occupational therapy play ideas that can help kids offset screen time, and can be a great resource for parents, teachers, camp counselors, etc. Our Akron occupational therapists tried to keep in mind the fact that many parents right now are looking for fresh summer activity ideas that won’t break the bank. Many of these are activities the whole family can enjoy!

Make Kinetic Sand

Kinetic sand is something of a wonder, and it’s fun for kids and adults alike. It’s easy to clean, magically sticks to itself, and can be easily stored. It also doesn’t dry out, so it lasts a long time. Kinetic sand can be used to help with tons of fine motor skills, like cutting, shaping, mixing, molding, and digging. It can help with with social-emotional regulation because it’s calming and provides great sensory input. Kids can get creative with it – especially when they make their own! The OT Toolbox offers an easy, three-ingredient Kinetic sand that simply requires sand, shaving cream, and baking soda. Super simple, and lots of fun to make!

Akron occupational therapists

Make Ice Cream Crafts

SO many ways to tailor this, using different materials and ideas. But in almost all of them, kids are going to be exercising their executive functioning and fine motor skills, as well as their creative muscles. Here are list of 15 cool ice cream craft ideas, using everything from balloons & glitter to cotton balls & construction paper to paper mache and paint. (Making their own ice cream sundae can also be a fun, once-in-a-while activity, with a little mess to be expected.)

occupational therapists Akron

Plant seeds.

There are SO many sensory benefits that come with gardening. And, as our Akron occupational therapists can explain, kids can help with planning the garden, learning about the various plants and what they need to grow, documenting the growth as they mature from seedling to full bloom. Planting and weed pulling is great for proprioception. Plant herbs, flowers, or vegetables – and let kids touch, taste, see, and hear. Add some wind chimes or a water feature for extra sensory input. Read more about the benefits of sensory gardening here.

Akron OT kids

Have your child make their own snack!

Maybe it’s not something you’d expect them to do every day, when the school year is in full-swing. But the summer can provide a great opportunity for kids to practice their independence and put together their own snack. This helps with fine motor skills, sensory input, executive functioning and (if they’re working with a parent or sibling) communication and social skills. Some easy recipes might include things like honey crispy treats, mini fruit pizzas, fruit kabobs, ants on a log, and fruit and yogurt parfaits. You might even consider pre-making a healthy, self-serve snack box and maybe some pictures with ideas to help them out.

occupational therapy kids Akron

Make an obstacle course in chalk.

This is going to help them work on motor planning, executive function, balance, and creativity! Set up in the driveway or nearby sidewalk, give them chalk and help them get started: Lily pads for frog hopping? A bridge to tip toe or balance over? An animal walk on a wavy line? A square for dancing? It doesn’t have to be complicated. There is a great example of a chalk obstacle course here!

Cleveland occupational therapy

Write a friend a letter.

It could be a friend. Or Grandma/Grandpa. Or maybe simply to someone in a nursing home who might be lonely and could use some cheering up. Have them work on their letter formation and draw a happy picture!

occupational therapists Akron

Tie dye a shirt.

This one requires some adult oversight, but it can be a lot of fun – and the results can be very cool! Check out these simple instructions for tie dying here.

Akron OT

These are just a few ideas! If you’re looking for some thoughts more tailored to your child’s exact skill-level and OT goals, just ask one of our Akron occupational therapists! We hope everyone is enjoying a wonderful – and safe – summer!

Therapy & Wellness Connection – your connection to a life without limitations – provides speech therapy to children in Akron, Cleveland, Brecksville-Broadview Heights and surrounding communities. We also offer summer camp, day programs, education services, vocational counseling and more. Call us at (330) 748-4807 or send us an email.

Additional Resources:

Summer Development Activities for Kids, May 8, 2020, By Heather Greutman, GrowingHandsOnKids.com

More Blog Entries:

Does My Child Have Sensory Processing Disorder? Feb. 12, 2022, Akron Occupational Therapy Blog

ADHD occupational therapy

Can Occupational Therapy Help Kids With ADHD?

Historically, children with ADHD (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder) have been treated with medications like Ritalin, Adderall, and Dexadrine. But while these medications can be effective for some kids, they can also have significant adverse side effects. For many kids, occupational therapy can be an effective, holistic alternative, if not a complement, to the use of medications for kids with ADHD. (As always, it’s important to talk to your child’s doctors before making any decisions pertaining to medication.) 

Specifically, research published in the American Journal of Occupational Therapy found that kids with ADHD who were treated with alternative interventions such as a method known as “Cog-Fun” were effective in helping them to lead functional lives in school, home, and other environments of daily living.

What is ADHD?

If you’re reading this, you’re likely aware that ADHD is a condition diagnosed when there is a persistent pattern of inattention and/or hyperactivity-impulsivity interfering with function or development. It’s generally considered a neurological disorder, impacting a person’s executive functions (cognitive skills), emotions, and behavior – impeding developmental progress, academic success, and relationship building.  People with ADHD struggle to remember, plan, and regulate their emotions.

It is often (but not always) diagnosed in childhood and lasts into adulthood. There’s no “cure,” but there are treatments – which will differ for children compared to adults

How is ADHD Treated With Occupational Therapy

Early intervention for kids with ADHD requires inter-disciplinary collaboration from parents and caregivers, teachers, and therapists. Cognitive behavioral interventions -treatment that involves efforts to change thinking patterns – is recommended, the earlier the better. That’s because children’s neuro pathways have yet to form and/or become rigid.

Brecksville occupational therapy

A Child’s “Occupation” is Play – A Brecksville Occupational Therapy Perspective

Those first introduced to the world of early intervention therapy are often confused as to why children would need occupational therapy. After all, kids don’t have “occupations,” right?

Actually, they do!

As our Brecksville occupational therapy practitioners can explain, children’s “occupations” involve the business of growing and developing. That means picking up fine and gross motor skills, learning to communicate and socialize, grasping self-care, feeding, and emotional regulation, and overall navigating the world around them. Play is the means through which kids master their neurological and biological development. Engaging in activities that are both fun and creative helps kids to ultimately become independent adults.

That is why play-based occupational therapy is so effective. As noted by the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA), it is often through play that kids learn to make sense of and engage with the world around them. Occupational therapists help children who are struggling in certain areas – most frequently with neurological, muscular, and social/communication skills due to a developmental delay, disability or injury/illness. We do this through sensory-rich play that offers opportunities for them to develop/master those skills while also having fun. We never want sessions to feel like work, even if that’s ultimately what they are.

How Brecksville Occupational Therapy Practitioners Use Play-Based Therapy

As occupational therapists, we use play not only to address the child’s goals, but also to help motivate them to challenge themselves.

Some of the ways we work with children during play-based occupational therapy include:

  • Helping to modify toys or the environment so that the child can get just the right of sensory input without being overwhelmed.
  • Recommending to parents activities for play and toys that can offer just the right amount of challenge for a child so that they are learning/working on a skill set, but also still having fun. We can also incorporate play into a variety of exercises that are geared toward helping build on the child’s abilities and strengths.
  • Crafting our sessions around play opportunities that encourage social skills like turn-taking and neurological skills like problem-solving. We’ll take in the unique priorities and routines of your family when formulating strategies you can use to incorporate this kind of play in your everyday life.

Some examples of toys and activities that we frequently use to work on certain skills:

  • Manipulative play with toys like board games, play dough and LEGOs. What we’re looking for here is boosting the child’s dexterity and hand-eye coordination.
  • Sensory-rich play with things like finger paints, magnets, kinetic sand, water toys, balls and beads. Lots of kids we work with struggle with sensory dysregulation. Playing with toys that incorporate sight, sound, tough, smell, and movement helps them work on sensory integration and regulation.
  • Imaginative play with things like dolls, puppets, phones, stuffed animals, etc. Pretend play is an excellent way for kids to practice key social skills.

It’s important that whatever toy or activity we use is appropriate to both the child’s age and maturity level. Toys and activities need not be expensive to be effective. Although our occupational therapists can conduct sessions in the home, at school, or in other settings, one benefit of in-clinic sessions is that we have a wealth of tools and toys within arm’s reach.

Our occupational therapy team works with kids with a broad range of disabilities, delays and challenges. If you’re interested in our play-based occupational therapy services in Brecksville-Broadview Heights, our team would be happy to connect with you!

Therapy & Wellness Connection – your connection to a life without limitations – is a pediatric therapy center providing occupational therapy, physical therapy, speech therapy and ABA/behavior therapy to children in Northeast Ohio. We also offer summer camp, day programs, education services, vocational counseling and more. Call us at (330) 748-4807 or send us an email. Serving Brecksville, Akron, Cleveland and surrounding communities in Northeast Ohio.

Additional Resources:

Learning Through Play, American Occupational Therapy Association

More Blog Entries:

Fun Fall Activities From Our Akron Occupational Therapists, Oct. 8, 2021, Brecksville Occupational Therapy Blog

Brecksville occupational therapy kids

Does My Child Need Occupational Therapy?

If we’re doing it right, those peering into a pediatric occupational therapy session will think it just looks like, well, playing! But those glimpses can leave a lot of people confused about what exactly occupational therapy is and why it’s needed for kids. Our Brecksville pediatric therapy team is happy to explain.

As noted by the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA), occupational therapy is a branch of health care that helps people of all ages with physical, sensory, social, or cognitive problems. It’s a broad discipline, but the primary goal is helping people to achieve independence in all areas of life. We look at what barriers are standing in the way of that.

Occupational therapists may work with adults who have suffered from strokes or serious injuries to regain their independence. With children, we are working to help them achieve independence they likely did not have in the first place. We do this by assisting them when they’re struggling with developmental delays, fine motor skills, gross motor skills, social skills, oral motor skills, visual processing, or sensory disorders. Mostly, we work with children who have some marked developmental delays or diagnosed disabilities, but we do sometimes work with kids on one-off (but important) skills – like handwriting – with which they may be struggling.

How Occupational Therapy Can Help Your Child

In examining whether a child needs our Brecksville occupational therapy services, we look at what day-to-day difficulties they are having at home, at school, and in their community. Often, they’re grappling with challenges that don’t affect most typically-developing children (or don’t affect them the same way).

A great occupational therapist will support not only the child but the child’s family too.

Some of the areas in which we can help:

  • Developmental delays. This is when a child is behind other kids their same age in certain areas of development. It’s typically flagged when a child fails to meet certain developmental milestones such as sitting, crawling, walking, learning at an age-appropriate level or failing to develop age-appropriate social and play skills.
  • Fine motor skills. Fine motor skills are essential to so many basic tasks of daily living. These are the sorts of fine movements that are needed to do things like hold a pencil, use scissors, button a shirt, feed yourself, etc. It often involves the fine motor of the fingers, but it can also be issues with the toes, wrists, tongue and lips. If your child has trouble feeding themselves, picking up/holding small objects or avoids things like puzzles and coloring, they might have fine motor skill issues. We can help!

    Gross motor skills. These include the wider movements of body parts like arms, legs, and core. These are the movements that help us control our body. If a child is having difficulty with movement, balance, or strength, an occupational therapist can help them strengthen these skills to improve independence.

    Visual processing. This is the skill that allows us to make use of what we’re seeing. It’s how our brain interprets the information it’s receiving visually. A child with visual processing issues is going to have trouble with things like recognizing letters, shapes, and numbers, finding objects among other objects, visually tracking objects, copying items from the board onto their paper, or ascertaining right from left. An occupational therapist can help.

    Oral motor/oral sensory. This is when the child struggles to control the muscle movements of the face and mouth. You’ll notice this is an issue if your child has excessive drool, chews in the front of their mouth rather than in the back, struggles with drinking from a cup or straw when their peers have no trouble, or is an excessively picky eater. Our occupational therapy team has many tools and strategies we can use to help with these problems.

    Sensory processing. This is how we make sense of information gleaned from our five senses (sight, smell, touch, taste, sound, and hearing). Kids can be either overly-sensitive or under-stimulated by sensory input. Kids with sensory processing issues (particularly common among those on the autism spectrum) may be constantly moving/jumping/bumping/crashing, under-reactive to certain issues, emotionally reactive or have trouble adjusting to change. They may also have a really tough time calming themselves down with they’re upset.

    Social interactions. Humans are social creatures. Our ability to understand social cues and form positive relationships with those around us is central to our ability to function in daily life. If a child has difficulty engaging socially, adapting to new environments, or communicating (delayed language skills or hyper-focused on a single subject), it can impede their ability to function. We have lots of strategies we can teach to help them in these areas.

    Learning difficulties. Sometimes referred to as learning disabilities, these are often related to developmental delays and certain conditions. A child with a learning difficulty may be unable to concentrate or focus, be easily distracted, struggle to follow instructions and complete work, have poor impulse control, or need lots of extra help learning new material.

Bear in mind that all kids are going to develop at their own pace. But if you have concerns about your child falling behind or struggling in certain areas, the earlier we can intervene with occupational therapy, the better the chances they’ll be able to “catch up” to their peers and/or have the greatest shot at independence.

Therapy & Wellness Connection – your connection to a life without limitations – is a pediatric therapy center providing occupational therapy, physical therapy, speech therapy and ABA therapy to children with special needs in Northeast Ohio. We also offer summer camp, day programs, education services, vocational counseling and more. Call us at (330) 748-4807 or send us an email. Serving Brecksville, Akron, Cleveland and surrounding communities in Northeast Ohio.

Additional Resources:

Back to School Resources During COVID-19, AOTA

More Blog Entries:

Occupational Therapy vs. Physical Therapy: What’s the Difference? July 3, 2021, Brecksville Occupational Therapy Blog

Akron occupational therapists

Akron Occupational Therapists Explain How Exercise Boosts Kids’ Concentration

Attention is a necessary component for children’s development and academic success. But helping kids maintain attention and focus has undoubtedly gotten tougher in recent years. We’re confronted with increased screen time, compelling animations and other constant distractions. It’s especially tough when the child has an additional challenge such as attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or autism and the task is something non-preferred. As our Akron occupational therapists can explain, one of the best ways to improve attention for an important task or just throughout the day is exercise!

Research over the last 30 years has boosted our understanding of the benefits of exercise, confirming that it:

  • Boosts biological chemicals essential for brain cell growth.
  • Stimulates the birth of new neurons.
  • Mobilizes genes believed to enhance brain plasticity (the brain’s ability to alter neural pathways).
Akron OT

Sensory Meltdown vs. Tantrum: What’s the Difference? Akron OT Explains

Lots of people think the terms meltdown and tantrum are interchangeable. It’s true they look very much the same when a child is in the midst of one, but the reasons behind them – and how you respond to each – are actually quite different. As an Akron OT (occupational therapist) can explain, knowing the difference between the two can help you react in a way that’s going to best support your child.

What is a Tantrum? 

Tantrums are outbursts that occur when a child is trying to get something they want or need. If you have toddlers or preschoolers, you know temper tantrums are pretty par for the course. However, they tend to taper off as children gain the language necessary to express themselves and the tools needed to self-regulate their emotional responses.

Some children find it’s tough to keep their emotions in check even once they do have the language skills to cope. They get frustrated and angry quickly. They might throw a tantrum if a sibling gets more cereal than they do or if they’re denied a candy bar at the grocery store.

Of course, screaming, yelling and throwing ones’ self on the floor aren’t socially expected or appropriate ways to get what we want, but as an Akron OT or RBT can tell you, the behavior is occurring for a reason. It is serving a functional purpose. Ultimately, the behavior is somehow being reinforced. They have learned that engaging in this behavior has a desired outcome – even if it’s not always a positive one. You may notice some kids will stop in the middle of a tantrum to see if their parent or teacher is looking at them. Tantrums stop either when a child gets what he/she wants OR they are taught that throwing a tantrum will not get them what they want.

What is a Meltdown? 

Meltdowns are different from tantrums because they stem not necessarily for the purpose of a desired outcome, but because of a reaction to feeling overwhelmed. They are very common with children on the autism spectrum when they are receiving too much – or too little – sensory input. Certain textures, sights, sounds, tastes and personal interaction can lead to a kind of sensory overload.

Commotion at a grocery store or the different smells and textures of a non-preferred meal could trigger a meltdown. A sensory meltdown is a reaction of someone who is trying to process too much at once.

Think about it like this: Every person’s tolerance for sensory input is like a pitcher of water. Most of us can control the flow and fill the liquid a little at a time. Those of us with language and emotional coping skills can communicate when the pitcher is getting too full or shut the water off ourselves. A child without these skills – particularly one who is very sensitive to sensory stimuli – may not be able to control the flow before the pitcher gets too full and overflows. This is when one’s “fight or flight” response turns on – and is displayed through running away, yelling, crying or completely shutting down.

How an Akron OT Can Help With Meltdowns

An Akron OT and/or ABA therapist can work with your child to determine the root cause of your child’s outbursts. Is there a function? What is making them feel overwhelmed? We will look carefully at the antecedent (what happens just before the tantrum/meltdown), the behavior (the child’s action) and the consequence (what happens immediately after).

Sometimes, parents reinforce unexpected behaviors without realizing it. For example, if the function of a tantrum is that it allows the child to avoid a non-preferred task, parents may be unintentionally reinforcing that behavior by removing the child from the situation. If a meltdown is set off by sensory overload, we can work on self-regulation, visual schedules and other strategies to give child the tools to better cope.

Sensory meltdowns can sometimes last for hours.

We understand that when you’re child is having a big reaction in a public place, that can be very stressful for you too. But it’s important to understand that often, your child is having a big reaction because it feels like a big problem to them. Acknowledging their feelings is important too.

Ultimately, the best thing long-term is to help children develop self-regulation skills and to practice them yourself. Deep breathing, counting to a certain number and other self-soothing methods can help you respond with both wisdom and patient and reduce the incidence of tantrums and meltdowns.

Therapy & Wellness Connection – your connection to a life without limitations – provides ABA therapy to children in Cleveland, Brecksville-Broadview Heights, Akron and surrounding communities. We also offer summer camp, day programs, homeschooling, alternative schooling, virtual therapy and education, vocational counseling and more. Call us at (330) 748-4807 or send us an email.

Additional Resources:

The 3 Main Differences Between a Sensory Meltdown and a Temper Tantrum, Feb. 12, 2020, By Sa’iyda Shabazz, FamilyEducation.com

More Blog Entries:

What to Look for in a Cleveland Pediatric Occupational Therapist, Dec. 12, 2020, Akron OT Blog

occupational therapy

Best Occupational Therapy Board Games for Kids

Kids love board games. (So do a lot of grownups!) They’re a great way for kids to challenge their mind, practice turn-taking and test out their math skills. We use them a lot in our Northeast Ohio occupational therapy clinic not only because they’re excellent motivators, but they can also help us target things like hand strength, sensory input, bilateral coordination, visual discernment and other fine motor skills.

In short: Board games can make the “work” of occupational therapy a lot more fun! And kids learn better when they’re having fun.

Plus, with so much online schooling, virtual therapy, etc. this year, many parents are encouraging their kids to find other outlets for fun. Board games are a great alternative!